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Cell Division

Open Access

Erratum to: The loop-less tmCdc34 E2 mutant defective polyubiquitination in vitro and in vivo supports yeast growth in a manner dependent on Ubp14 and Cka2

  • Agnieszka Lass1,
  • Ross Cocklin2,
  • Kenneth M. Scaglione1, 3,
  • Michael Skowyra1, 4,
  • Sergey Korolev1,
  • Mark Goebl2Email author and
  • Dorota Skowyra1Email author
Contributed equally
Cell Division201611:13

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13008-016-0018-1

Received: 12 April 2016

Accepted: 12 April 2016

Published: 6 October 2016

The original article was published in Cell Division 2011 6:7

Erratum to: Cell Division 2011, 6:7 DOI 10.1186/1747-1028-6-7

After publication of this study [1], we found that the preparation of several figures did not follow the guidance given in the Instructions for Authors and resulted in unacknowledged modifications. This erratum acknowledges these modifications and shows that they neither affected the interpretation of the data nor the conclusions drawn from the data. The information below is supplementary in nature, as it does not alter or replace any information included in the study [1].

Supplemental figures

Supplement to Figure 1E

Original data with cdc34-2ts yeast growth used to prepare Figure 1E [ 1 ]. Each of the spot-dots shown in Figure 1E [1] was selected from the original electronic image as an individual square and reassembled in the original order with no individual changes in brightness or contrast. This approach allowed us to enlarge the areas with yeast growth without enlarging the empty spaces between spots and, hence, provide more detail. Blue color marks three additional CDC34 alleles that were not shown in Figure 1E nor discussed in the paper

Supplement to Figure 2A

Original data with yeast growth used to prepare Figure 2A [ 1 ]. Each spot-dot shown in Figure 2A [1] was selected from the original image as an individual square and reassembled in the original order with no individual changes in brightness or contrast. This approach was consistent with the approach used in Figure 1E, and allowed us to enlarge the areas with growth and, hence, provide more detail

Supplement to Figure 2C

Original images of tm CDC34 cells used to prepare Figure 2C [ 1 ]. White frames mark the four tm CDC34 cells that were intended to be shown. The left two tm CDC34 cell images shown in Figure 2C [1] are unintentional duplicates of the same cell

Supplement to Figure 4A

Original data used to prepare Figure 4A. wtCdc34 and tmCdc34 data sets shown in Figure 4A [1] were selected from a larger set of samples shown in full later in the same report (Figure 6A, [1]). The wtCdc34 and tmCdc34 sets of samples shown in Figure 4A [1] were separated on the same gel and analyzed on the same membrane, but were not loaded next to each other, as now indicated by the space between panels. The panels were reassembled without individual changes in brightness and contrast, and are now shown in the original order of loading (tmCdc34 set followed by wtCdc34 set) and probing (emphasized by gray arrow). The rearranged order shown in Figure 4A [1] was introduced to match the final editorial flow of text, where wtCdc34 samples were described before tmCdc34 samples (horizontal order), and Ub blots were described before Sic1 and Cdc34 blots (vertical order). This choice of presentation was editorial and had no bearing on the results or their interpretation. White asterisks mark bands of human keratin, a common contaminant cross-reacting with the crude rabbit serum used to detect Sic1, that were inappropriately removed from Figure 4A [1]. The generic label “Sic1 substrate” used on the top of the figure is a synonym of the more specific term Sic1-P (phosphorylated Sic1) used on the right in the α-Sic1 WB panel

Supplement to Figure 5B

Original data used to prepare Figure 5B. Each band shown in Figure 5B [1] was selected from the appropriate part of the original data set as an individual square and reassembled in the appropriate order without individual changes in brightness or contrast. This approach was consistent with the approach used in Figures 1E and 2A, did not alter the identities or the appearances of bands, and was used solely to reduce the overall figure size by removing irrelevant spaces and parts with no factual information

Supplement to Figure 6A

Original data presented in Figure 6A. Each of the panels shown in Figure 6A [1] was selected from the same, original, 17-line file and reassembled in the original order without individual changes in brightness or contrast. Panels without Cka2 kinase were first shown separately in Figure 4A [1], to introduce the key differences seen between Cdc34 and tmCdc34 samples. In addition, the Sic1 image in Figure 6A [1] had two cosmetic alterations. First, three bands of contaminating human keratin, now marked with white asterisks, were inappropriately removed. Second, the control reaction shown in lane 1, one of four identical control reactions shown on the same blot (lanes 1, 5, 10 and 15), was patched to cover up an irrelevant bubble. None of these changes altered the results or their interpretation

Notes

Declarations

Declarations

There is no change in authors’ contributions reported in [1]. All authors read and approved the previously published manuscript and this erratum.

Current authors’ information

Since publication of the original article the authors’ affiliations have changed. The current affiliations are as follows: Agnieszka Lass1†, Ross Cocklin2,5†, Kenneth M Scaglione1,3, Michael Skowyra1,4, Sergey Korolev1, Mark Goebl2* and Dorota Skowyra1*

1Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA; 3Neuroscience Research Center and Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; 4Dept. of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine; 5Department of Biology, Keene State College, Keene, NH.

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine
(2)
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine
(3)
Dept. of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School
(4)
Dept. of Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine

Reference

  1. Lass A, Cocklin R, Scaglione KM, Skowyra M, Korolev S, Goebl M, Skowyra D. The loop-less tmCdc34 E2 mutant defective polyubiquitination in vitro and in vivo supports yeast growth in a manner dependent on Ubp14 and Cka2. Cell Div. 2011;6:7.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2016

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